Types Of Loft Conversions:
© 2019 Uptown Lofts. All Rights Reserved.
Types of Loft Conversions...
Loft conversions fall into one of four basic types, which type you decide to use for your loft conversion will depend on many factors such as the design of your existing roof & your budget.
STUNNING, COST-EFFECTIVE LOFTS WITH NO COMPROMISE ON QUALITY…
Velux Loft Conversions
Velux and roof light conversions are becoming incredibly popular. Typically, this type of loft conversion is extremely cost effective and does not require planning permission. In a Velux loft conversion, windows or roof lights are installed into the roof, without changing the structure of the roof itself. This type of loft conversion is perfectly suited for lofts which already have a large amount of headroom, or on properties, such as those in conservation areas, where planning permission is unavailable.
Dormer Loft Conversions
The Dormer conversions are becoming increasingly popular. due to the amount of extra space created. Dormer conversions extend outward, in a box shape, from the side or back of a sloping roof. Internally, a dormer has a horizontal ceiling and vertical walls which is great for maximising space. Dormers are very popular and are generally considered to be the least expensive option, depending on the amount and style of dormers you add
Mansard Loft Conversions
A mansard roof has two slopes, the lower slope is close to vertical at 72 degrees and the top section of the roof is almost horizontal. This style of roof is named after a 17th-century French architect Francois Mansart (1598-1666) who used this design of roof on many of his buildings. A mansard roof has the advantage of maximising the available space within your loft. Mansards are commonly built by raising the party/gable walls either side of your house to make the profile for the mansard and then creating the timber frame. Although common on older properties, especially in cities like London, Mansards are not often seen in the suburbs. Flat roof dormers tend to be a more popular choice for the 'average' 3 bed semi or terrace house due to the reduced cost and simpler construction. A mansard loft conversion will almost certainly require planning permission.
Hip To Gable Loft Conversions
A hip to gable conversion involves making fairly major changes to the roof. The gable wall is built up to the ridge line and a new section of roof is built to fill in the gap. As a general rule, houses with hip roofs tend to not have enough internal volume for a conversion to be practical so a hip to gable conversion is the best solution. A new gable wall will be built either in masonary or studwork. There are several options for the finishing of the masonary gable wall, which include brickwork, blockwork with render or tiled. If the gable wall is built from studwork they are normally finished in render or tiled. For most people the preference of for the new gable wall to match the exisiting walls as much as possible. As a hip to gable conversion changes the outline of the roof planning permission may be required. You will need to determine if the conversion falls within your permitted development allowence. Once the roof has been extended the conversion is normally completed with either velux rooflights or a dormer.
Types Of Loft Conversions:
Types of Loft Conversions...
Loft conversions fall into one of four basic types, which type you decide to use for your loft conversion will depend on many factors such as the design of your existing roof & your budget.
STUNNING, COST-EFFECTIVE LOFTS WITH NO COMPROMISE ON QUALITY…
Velux Loft Conversions
Velux and roof light conversions are becoming incredibly popular. Typically, this type of loft conversion is extremely cost effective and does not require planning permission. In a Velux loft conversion, windows or roof lights are installed into the roof, without changing the structure of the roof itself. This type of loft conversion is perfectly suited for lofts which already have a large amount of headroom, or on properties, such as those in conservation areas, where planning permission is unavailable.
Mansard Loft Conversions
A mansard roof has two slopes, the lower slope is close to vertical at 72 degrees and the top section of the roof is almost horizontal. This style of roof is named after a 17th-century French architect Francois Mansart (1598-1666) who used this design of roof on many of his buildings. A mansard roof has the advantage of maximising the available space within your loft. Mansards are commonly built by raising the party/gable walls either side of your house to make the profile for the mansard and then creating the timber frame. Although common on older properties, especially in cities like London, Mansards are not often seen in the suburbs. Flat roof dormers tend to be a more popular choice for the 'average' 3 bed semi or terrace house due to the reduced cost and simpler construction. A mansard loft conversion will almost certainly require planning permission.
The Dormer conversions are becoming increasingly popular. due to the amount of extra space created. Dormer conversions extend outward, in a box shape, from the side or back of a sloping roof. Internally, a dormer has a horizontal ceiling and vertical walls which is great for maximising space. Dormers are very popular and are generally considered to be the least expensive option, depending on the amount and style of dormers you add
Dormer Loft Conversions
A hip to gable conversion involves making fairly major changes to the roof. The gable wall is built up to the ridge line and a new section of roof is built to fill in the gap. As a general rule, houses with hip roofs tend to not have enough internal volume for a conversion to be practical so a hip to gable conversion is the best solution. A new gable wall will be built either in masonary or studwork. There are several options for the finishing of the masonary gable wall, which include brickwork, blockwork with render or tiled. If the gable wall is built from studwork they are normally finished in render or tiled. For most people the preference of for the new gable wall to match the exisiting walls as much as possible. As a hip to gable conversion changes the outline of the roof planning permission may be required. You will need to determine if the conversion falls within your permitted development allowence. Once the roof has been extended the conversion is normally completed with either velux rooflights or a dormer.
Hip To Gable
Loft Conversions
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